Best Frog Rods

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It’s natural for anglers to try their luck with many kinds of lures in the search for that perfect formula that’ll guarantee a catch, but sometimes even the best may need a primer on the best rods and lures to look for. 

If you’re looking into frog rods and fishing with frog or toad lures then we can probably help, since we’ve compiled a list below of the best frog rods with their pros and cons laid bare for you to see.

Along with that we’ve got a small buyers’ guide and an FAQ so that you can learn what makes a rod better for frog fishing over other types, as well as the qualities and features you want in any decent rod. 

With that knowledge you should be able to find the best deals for the fairest price.

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Our top frog rods were the Cast-Frog-7’2” rods that are part of the KastKing Speed Demon Pro Tournament Series, a series of high-performance rods that have topped our lists before. 

Here’s what we particularly liked about them:

  • Combines lifting strength with a fast, tournament-performing action, thanks to this rod’s Elite Carbon Blanks and Nano Resin Tech construction.

  • Made with High Modulus graphite and S-Glass to be lightweight while maintaining its performance.

  • A long casting frog rod at 7-foot 2-inches long that combines heavy power and fast action fishing.

  • Fuji guides and Winn golf grips make your fishing experience as smooth and comfortable as possible.

Best Frog Rods - Comparison Table

Best Frog Rods - Reviews

Our top frog rod is the frog fishing variant of the KastKing Speed Demon Pro Tournament Series rods, a high-performance group of rods that have you covered over a variety of lengths, power, and action levels. 

For frog fishing though, there’s no doubt that you’ll want the Cast-Frog-7’2” version. This version is a heavy rod in the power department and has fast action.

The bragging rights from the Speed Demon Pro Tournament Series come from their marriage of strength with a lightweight and responsive fishing experience. 

This comes from the Elite Carbon Blanks and Nano Resin Technology that have been used in the construction of all of the rods of this series, and the cast-frog rods are no exception at all.

They’re made with a composite of S-Glass and High Modulus graphite which enables them to maintain their lifting strength without sacrificing their sensitivity for it. The rods are lined with fuji guides and real seats that keep your line firmly in place and undisturbed. 

Winn grips also make these rods a breeze to hold, which is half the battle when you’re looking for a comfortable fishing experience.

Pros

  • These rods are strong but sensitive thanks to their Elite Carbon Blanks and Nano Resin Technology.
  • 7-foot 2-inches long tournament rod that combines heavy power with fast action.
  • Composite rods of S-Glass and High Modulus graphite for a lightweight rod.
  • Fuji guides and Winn golf-style grips smoothen your fishing experience.

Cons

  • Some have reported resin residue left on the guides.

The second rod we have is another casting rod, the St Croix Mojo Bass Casting Rod, to be exact. It comes in a variety of power and action levels, but we recommend the medium to heavy power/fast action version for frog fishing. 

It’s also available in a variety of lengths but we think that most will do it for frog fishing so which one you pick is largely a matter of personal preference.

They’re made with St Croix’s own SCIII High Modulus graphite fiber that can withstand high levels of strain yet remain sensitive and lightweight. 

That durability and strain strength is also made stronger by the fact that the rod has integrated poly curve tooling technology that gets rid of transition points. 

This means it’s more or less a solid construction with no problem areas that would be the first to break in the event of a rod snap failure.

It also comes with a small assortment of other desirable features such as slim-profiled ferrules and strong aluminum-oxide rings, but we think the most important to highlight are the premium-grade cork handles that provide extra comfort for you.

Pros

  • A mid to high power rod with fast action and a wide choice of lengths.
  • Advanced SCIII High Modulus graphite is both durable and flexible.
  • Integrated poly curve tooling technology eliminates transitional points for increased strength.
  • Split-grip premium-grade cork handles are comfortable.

Cons

  • Not the best performing rod if you want far casting distance.

Our third option comes in with an assurance that they’re a great frog fishing rod, even having something of a cult following, the Dobyns Rod Fury Series model FR 735C Casting Rod. 

It’s a longer fishing rod at 7-feet 3-inches and has a heavier power rating and extra fast action.

Like many on this list, these are made with High Modulus graphite blanks that allow the model FR 735C rods are flexible but durable in equal measure, allowing for a faster action and more responsive rod while also performing better when under strain.

Even the line guides on these rods are made with enduring punishment in mind, being wrapped in Kevlar so that the guides won’t get worn away by the motion of your line and will keep that line reliably in place.

The handle is made with AAA grade natural cork along with a Hypalon butt too, making it a secure but comfortable rod to keep a hold of when the going gets tough and the fish start pulling away.

Pros

  • Long 7-foot 3-inch heavy power, extra fast action casting rod.
  • High Modulus graphite blanks.
  • Kevlar-wrapped line guides ensure stability.
  • Triple A grade natural cork grip and Hypalon butt.

Cons

  • Stiff bar isn’t ideal for lighter baits.

Next up are a set of medium to medium heavy rods, and you also get a choice of length with them too. 

These are the Berkley E-Motion Casting Rods, an affordable rod that allows you to choose between general purpose, top water, or deep crank styles depending on what you’re looking for. 

We like that it affords you the choice, since you may easily need a rod specifically for topwater frog fishing.

The rod mixes both 30- and 24-ton graphite into its construction so you can get the best of both worlds in terms of durability and strength versus flexibility and responsiveness. 

By using two graphite classifications at different parts of this rod, it can be stronger where it needs to be but softer where it counts.

As for the rest of the rod, it’s kitted out with a High Energy Transfer reel seat that makes fishing with this rod effortless since it turns every ounce of tension in the rod to your advantage when you get a bite. 

It also has a soft coat texture all around it that makes it a comfortable rod to hold, too, which is always a welcome property in a rod you’ll be spending lots of time with.

The guides on these are micro guides, which aren’t a crowd pleaser, so if you’re not a fan of these guides then you may want to skip out on this rod.

Pros

  • Composite blend of 30- and 24-ton graphite.
  • H.E.T reel seat with soft coat texture makes using this rod feel effortless and comfortable.
  • Allows a choice of rod style and length.

Cons

  • These rods have micro guides, not liked by everyone.

Our last option is the Ardent Denny Brauer Pro Series Baitcasting Rods, a medium to heavy action long rod that measures in at 7-foot 2-inches long, all the better to cast out further distances with but it should tackle shorter distances well too.

It’s a very stable rod anyway thanks to its premium Fuji aluminum-oxide line guides, and it also rests in your hands well since it’s fitted with cork grips. 

The grips help by not only reducing fatigue but also being more sensitive to vibrations that can pass through the rod, letting you know you have an interested fish sooner than other rods might.

It’s a lightweight yet durable rod, being manufactured from Intermediate Modulus 8 rated graphite. This means it occupies a sweet spot between responsiveness and strength but isn’t as much overkill as High Modulus can be. 

If you don’t gel well with higher modulus graphite rods then these could be the ones for you, especially since the intermediate modulus carries with it a less hefty price tag.

Pros

  • A medium/heavy action long rod at 7-feet 2-inches long.
  • IM-8 graphite used for these rods is lightweight yet stable when you’re fishing.
  • Pleasing to both the look and the touch thanks to its aluminum-oxide line guides and cork grips.

Cons

  • No customer reviews on its listing page.

Best Frog Rods - Buyers Guide

How to choose the best frog rods

When searching for rods to perform any kind of specific technique or fishing style with, you need to pay more attention than usual to what different rods are capable of. 

That said, versatility is something to be desired in most products if you’re after an efficient purchase that’ll stretch your cash as possible. 

That’s why the rods you’ll see above are primarily made of graphite, since it can offer strength and fast action in equal measure, and all for an affordable price.

In this guide we’ll break the rods down to what properties you’ll want from them, such as the type and length of the rod, its power rating, and action rating, elaborating on which materials and features help these as we explain.

Types of Rod

You’ll want a baitcasting rod rather than a spinning rod for frog fishing. Spinning rod outfits are best for smaller lures so they aren’t the best option when looking for a frog rod. Instead you’ll want a casting rod like those above, preferably with a capable baitcaster.

Casting rods let you increase your accuracy, which you’ll need with the longer lengths of rod that frog fishing demands, and the improved aim is better for disturbing bass hideouts where they’ll be lurking for frogs. 

These hideouts usually take the form of weed beds and lily pad groups. Baitcaster reels are more accurate than the standard spinning reels, and they’re much less tiring to use too for when you’re fishing over the course of a day.

Length of Rod

When looking for good frog rod lengths, you should follow the general rule that a frog rod shouldn’t fall below seven foot, and can be as long as seven foot and ten inches, though we imagine a few extra inches won’t hurt too much if you know what you’re doing. 

Longer rods allow you to hold them up straight with more control, which is useful for when you hook that bass.

You’ll see all of the rods above fit into this size bracket. Longer rods are better for longer casts and they can generally have more power behind them, but accuracy is harder to nail down for less experienced anglers.

Within the length parameters you’ll want to pick a size that you’re comfortable with and will be easier to use at your local fishing spot depending on that spot’s size, space, and depth. 

We’d recommend seven foot six inches as the sweet spot for a frogging rod, but an inch or two in either direction shouldn’t hurt either.

Power Rating

Frog fishing changes how you need to think about power for a lot of anglers. Many conflate heavier power with handling heavier fish and lures, but the power you’re after with frog fishing rods are needed to be able to pull bass out of the weeds that they’re hiding in. 

This needs a rod with quite some endurance, strain-tolerance, and stopping power.

Medium rods lack these features and will make fighting with the bass a chore a lot of the time, if not a downright failure. 

You should also be using a heavy braid which only really works with heavy power rods, or at the least medium-heavy, so those should be the ones you’re going for.

Action Rating

When considering the action rating of your frog fishing rods, you should aim for fast action rods or even extra-fast action rods. You should do this because the tip sensitivity and easy hooking ability of these rods make for a more reactive catch. 

Faster actions tend to cast shorter distances, but that’s why you’ll want a longer rod to compensate for that.

With slower action rods you sacrifice a lot of sensitivity, which makes fishing in obstructed waters difficult since you need to discern when you’ve caught a bass, or some weed bed.

You’ll want the fast to extra-fast action rating so that your casting accuracy and striking ability benefit from the more sensitive tip.

Frequently Asked Questions

What color frog should I use?

The color of frog you go for will depend on your fishing waters and the weather around those waters. If you’re fishing in muddy waters or on a sunny day in cleaner waters, then you’ll want to instead present the dark mass of the frog by using a darker-colored frog, maybe even black.

Otherwise, if you’re fishing in skies that are overcast or rainy, and the water is not muddy but stained, then you want a frog lure that’s more eye catching, leading you to brighter colors. 

This often leads anglers to choose the most striking colors like white or chartreuse.

What gear ratio is best for frog fishing?

Anglers often prefer a faster gear ratio reel from 6:3 to about 7:3 so that you can have faster-burning presentations and keep the lure constantly moving. This allows you to better simulate the hopping and swimming movement of frogs.

What time is best for fishing for bass with frog bait?

As with any other topwater fishing, you’ll generally find that the early morning and late afternoon are better times of day to cast your frog out. 

That said, you can throw a frog all day, but when the sun is rising and setting in the morning and late afternoon is when bass tend to be the most active.

As for the time of year, we’ve found more luck with frog baits through the summer period, from early summer till the start of fall. 

This is because bass go after larger fish bait in the spring and early summer periods before transitioning more to alternative, smaller baits like baitfish and frogs. 

The above applies to most of the States, but if you’re in a southern area that enjoys hotter temperatures than you may want to pay attention to water temperatures. 

When the water temperatures reach 70 degrees or thereabouts, frogs can be used no matter the weather quite long into fall, until the cold weather and frost starts to roll in.

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